Galactic Dynamics

Galaxies are the fundamental building blocks of the Universe. Massive galaxies can be subdivided into two major morphological groups. Elliptical galaxies are characterised by a dominant spheroidal stellar component with stars moving on random orbits. Spiral galaxies, on the other hand, show a dominant disk component made of stars and gas, including a central spheroidal bulge component. In both cases, massive, extended dark matter halos appear to surround the visible components of the galaxies. While massive galaxies contain most of the mass in the Universe, by far the most frequent galaxy type are dwarf galaxies which often have complex, irregular gas distributions as even a few supernovae can strongly perturb or even destroy any disk component. Dwarfs are often found as satellites orbiting more massive galaxies, providing interesting information about the hierarchical building blocks that merged into giant galaxies. High-resolution photometry in different wavelength regimes and spectroscopic data now gives very detailed insight into the internal structure of galaxies. Many observations are puzzling and contain information about the complex formation history of galaxies and their internal dynamics. Questions that we are currently investigating are:

 

The Peculiar Structure of High-Redshift Disk Galaxies

Young disk galaxies have recently been observed at high cosmological redshifts of z=2, corresponding to epochs where the Universe was just 1/3rd its present age. This epoche is especially interesting as it corresponds to the peak in the star formation rate of the Cosmos and the time when the morphologies of the galaxies were determined. High-redshift galaxies have recently been detected and observed with the larges telescopes e.g. of ESO. It soon became clear that these obejcts are very different compared with present-day disk galaxies. For example, they form stars with enormous rates that are a factor of 10 - 100 higher than in nowadays. The star formation is concentrated in gigantic clumps of molecular gas, about 1000 times larger than present-day molecular clouds, and as big as dwarf galaxies. In addition, the gas in the disks is highly turbulent, driven by energetic sources that are not well understood up to now. In collaboration with the observational infrared/submillimeter group at the Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching we are investigating the origin and structure of the observed giant gas clumps in young galactic disks as well as their evolution and star formation history. Are these clumps the sites for the formation of the old globular clusters and supermassive black holes that are found today in galaxies as relics of an earlier time of violent star formation? Is there evidence of massive gas accretion onto these young galactic disks from the surrounding cosmic web which serves as a reservoir of gas? Into which present-day galaxy type do these disks evolve? How important are these galaxies for the chemical enrichment of the cosmos with heavy elements?

 

The Structure of Elliptical Galaxies and their Relation to Supermassive Black holes

In recent years observations have revealed a strong correlation between the central supermassive black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies as manifested in the relation between the BH mass and the bulge velocity dispersion, M_BH-sigma and the bulge stellar mass M_BH-M_bulge. More massive BHs typically reside in more massive galaxies, with the observed relations thus indicating a link between the formation of the BHs and their host galaxies. Energetic feedback from BHs during the quasar phase can potentially drive out gas from the galaxies thus setting a maximum scale for galaxy masses. In addition, this AGN feedback might quench star formation in the most massive galaxies explaining why massive galaxies are typically non-starforming ellipticals We have implemented a simple Bondi-Hoyle based BH accretion model into our numerical code. In this model 0.5% of the accreted rest mass energy is coupled as thermal energy to the surrounding gas. Expanding on previous work we have showed that the observed relations can be produced in both equal- and unequal-mass merger simulations of gas-rich disks and early-type galaxies. In the Figure below we show a comparison of our simulated sample with the local observed relations and demonstrate that both equal- and unequal-disk mergers reproduce the observed results equally well. In addition we have studied the evolution of the scaling relations during the merger of the BHs as it is not obvious if the scaling relations are valid during the merging process and at what stage the galaxies evolve onto the relations. Finally, we have studied in detail the termination of star formation by energetic BH feedback during galaxy mergers as this is a viable mechanism for reproducing the observed population of dead and red elliptical galaxies. black hole sigma and stellar mass relationThe image shows the M_BH-sigma (left) and M_BH-M_* (right) relations for our complete sample of 1:1 (circles) and 3:1 (triangles) mergers. The black, green and red symbols show the effect of varying the initial gas mass fraction, whereas the blue symbols show the variation caused by the orbit and initial geometry for a fixed gas fraction. The lines show the observed relations with errors by Tremaine et al. (2002) and Haring&Rix (2004), respectively (Johansson et al. 2009).

 

 

The Outer Structure of Elliptical Galaxies and their Dark Matter Halos

The outer haloes of elliptical galaxies have been studied by observations for several years to adress the questions of the nature of the Dark Matter halo they are embedded in and the mechanisms that drive the formation of elliptical galaxies. While the extended cold gas disks in spiral galaxies can be used to measure the rotation curves and the line-of-sight velocity dispersions (LOSVD), for ellipticals we need to use other tracers for the outher haloes since ellipticals do not contain any cold gas anymore. Instead, planetary nebulae have been used as tracers for the LOSVD. Those measurements revealed a huge variety of different profiles, some flattening to nearly constant values, some increasing again in the outer part and some decreasing fastly, showing nearly no evidence of a dark matter halo. While observations only show us a snapshot in the life of the galaxy, with simulations we can look at evolution scenarios. Currently there are two different scenarios discussed: The build up of an elliptical by several minor mergers spread over time, and the build up through a single major merger (a merger with a mass ratio less than 3:1). Also from obeservations we know that especially very massive elliptical galaxies are most frequent in very dense environments, like in galaxy clusters, and those environments provide best conditions for both merger scenarios. We study a sample of simulated ellipticals with different formation scenarios, from major merger scenarios to minor merger build ups, and different environments, from dense cluster environments to isolated field environments, to explain the origin of these different profiles and understand what we can learn from them.

 

 

The Origin and Structure of Magnetic Fields in present-day Galaxies and Galaxy Groups

simulated radio map of the Antenae galaxiesThe effect of nonthermal pressure components, i.e. magnetic fields and high energy particles, on the evolution of galaxies and structure formation in the Universe, is still not well understood. Contrary to the thermal pressure, nonthermal components are not subject to cooling processes. Thus, once present, a nonthermal pressure affects the environment over long timescales. This influence might impede the collapse of gas and thus lower the star formation rate. Along with the reduction of star formation, the injection of cosmic rays as well as the associated turbulence is also lowered. Turbulence, however, is believed to be the main source of magnetic field amplification. This correlation suggests a self-regulated state and thus equipartition between all corresponding pressure components. This theoretical scenario, which is supported also by the Radio-FIR-correlation, is the framework of our research. Magnetic fields pervade intracluster and interstellar material. Even more astonishing, strong (10-100 micro Gauss) magnetic fields have been observed in very young objects like damed Ly-alpha systems, an observation, which is up to now not satisfactory explained. As a first step towards a more complete understanding of the evolution of magnetic fields in the Universe, we want to shed light on its evolution in isolated and interacting present-day galaxies. Our numerical investigations of the magnetic field evolution in interacting and merging galaxies suggest equipartition between the magnetic and turbulent pressure, as expected from theory. Thereby, even small intitial magnetic fields are amplified efficiently up to the equipartition level during the interaction. This result is particularly interesting in the framework of hierarchical structure formation, within which the formation of galaxies is characterized by more or less intense merging of smaller galactic subunits. Given our numerical results, the merging of these subunits might have been accompanied by a significant amplification of the magnetic field, thus explaining the high magneitc field values obserbed in damped Ly-alpha systems. Artificial radio maps derived from our simulations also compare well with observations.

 

Supernova Feedback and Galactic Halo Enrichment

supernova-driven windStar formation in galaxies causes supernova explosions, and thereby both turbulence and, if strong enough, winds or galactic fountains. Galactic winds are found in nearby starburst galaxies as well as in high-redshift Lyman-break systems. High star formation rates, outflow features and turbulence are prime characteristics for high-redshift galaxies. Phenomenologically, the stars form in clusters. The supernova feedback quickly evacuates these sites by forming hot bubbles. The star formation is hence quickly terminated, the bubbles overlap and form the wind. The outflowing ISM forms filaments that are observed in optical emission lines, but also in soft X-rays. Previous work suggests that the hot gas carried away by the wind is highly enriched with metals, comparable to solar metallicity, which is due to direct enrichment from supernovae. Winds are typically strong enough to propagate far into the intergalactic medium, suggesting that in combination with supernova feedback they likely play an important role in metal enrichment of galactic haloes. Here, we investigate thie phenomenon of galactic outflows with 3D hydrodynamics simulations, in particular with the aim to find a logical connection between star formation, turbulence and outflow characteristics. Both wind and convective solutions shall be investigated. Up to now, it is still poorly understood which mechanisms are most significant to launch a galactic outflow. Our simulations yield evidence that ISM turbulence generated by SN feedback is insufficient to give rise to an outflow, and a medium comprising several gas phases of different temperatures and densities is required in any case. Yet, buoyancy of SN bubbles might already become significant in a few cases, though it is likely not the main wind driver. This leaves the thermal pressure within superbubbles as the most promising source of energy strong enough to provoke galactic-scale outflows. It turned out, however, that under a wide range of conditions our simulations fail to blow a wind. To clarify in detail, which processes favour the development of convective or wind-like outflows, we propose a systematic parameter study.

 

Galaxy formation and evolution

Galaxy Merger

The formation and evolution of galaxies is still unknown in many aspects. Studies of the large scale structure of the universe revealed that galaxies live in several different environments. Some galaxies live in the field, that is they show no signs of interaction with neighbouring galaxies and the distances between the galaxy and its nearest massive neighbours are large compared to their size. Most of the field galaxies are spiral galaxies. In contrast a cluster consists of more than 100 galaxies within 2-10 Mpc and therefore is a very dense region. Galaxies in these environments have very high relative velocities and show signs of interactions. The fraction of elliptical galaxies is high compared to the field. Independent of the environment observations show a decrease of the fraction of star forming galaxies with decreasing redshift. This lead to the assumptions that elliptical galaxies are build by collisions of galaxies, which is a common event in a dense environment, while in a field environment galaxy mergers are uncommon and therefore the galaxies remain undisturbed and are supposed to mostly grow by smooth accretion.

 

 

 

General formation setup for galaxies

In the standard cosmology assumed today, the $\Lambda$ Cold Dark Matter scenario, in the early universe small perturbations collapse first and produce dark matter halos that accumulate baryons at the center. The small structures aggregate successively into larger structures. This process is called the hierarchical growth. Therefore, if we want to study galaxy formation we need to analyze and understand their assembly history. Numerical simulations have shown that there are several processes for the mass assembly: merger events between two nearly equally massive halos, called major merger, merger between a massive halo and a small sattelite halo, called minor merger, and the accretion of material that is not correlated with the assembly of a halo, for example in the course of a flyby event or by accretion of gas along filamental structures followed by in situ star formation. With increasing computational power it is now possible to perform cosmological simulations and to follow the merger and accretion history of halos from high redshifts to z=0.

 

 

Elliptical galaxies build up scenarios

For elliptical galaxies there are two main possible scenarios assumed: Major merger and minor merger (or cosmological) growth. Observations tell us that there exists ellipticals already at high redshifts, but we also see major merger currently at work (for example in the Antaennae system and the Mice system), especially in medium dense environments like galaxy groups. Simulations of major mergers between two big spiral galaxies have successfully reproduced elliptical galaxies, but they failed to explain the formation of the most massive ellipticals in the universe, the BCGs (Brightest Cluster Galaxies). Cosmological simulations recently revealed another formation scenario: Here the most massive structures grow through the continuous infall of small galaxies, so called minor mergers. In these scenario the galaxy grows fast at high redshift, where major merger are more common due to the fact that the masses of the galaxies are lower at higher redshifts (hierarchical growth) and the environment is generally denser (less evolved structures), and the accretion slowes down at lower redshifts, dominated by the infall of less massive structures. If enough of these small structures fall into a galaxy, they are able to change the morphology of the galaxy very efficiently. In addition, cosmological simulations show that about 40% of the material of a galaxy is accreted by smooth accretion. Star formation is triggered by major and minor mergers, thus in both scenarios there is (nearly) no cold gas inside the ellipticals left when the elliptical has formed, and the star formation gets to an end, the ellipticals are red and dead, as observed.

 

Joint evolution of galaxies and black holes

In the current picture of galaxy formation it is now generally accepted that every massive spheroidal galaxy host a supermassive black hole in its center. Moreover, black hole masses are found be tightly correlated to host galaxy properties, as luminosity, bulge mass and velocity dispersion. This suggests that the evolution of galaxies and the growth of black holes is not de-coupled, but goes hand and hand. E.g. feedback from actively accreting black holes is assumed to regulate black hole growth itself and also to influence the evolution of the host galaxy by quenching cooling and further star formation. Furthermore, major mergers and the corresponding infall of large amounts of cold gas, which is then available for star formation and provides also a fuel for black hole growth, are believed to be important events in establishing the observed, local relations between black hole masses and host galaxy properties. However, detailed physical processes are still poorly understood and thus, subject of current research. For example, a puzzling, open question is to explain the anti-hierarchical trend in black hole growth within a hierarchical structure formation model. Different observational studies show that - investigating the number density evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGN) - more luminous AGN peak at higher redshift than less luminous ones. This implies that more massive black holes seem to form already very early in the Universe, whereas less massive objects seem to predominantly evolve only at later times, in contrast to what is expected from our current hierarchical structure formation models. Here, semi-analytic models are appropriate tools in order to study easily the effect of different trigger mechanisms for black hole accretion, the corresponding accretion efficiencies and different prescriptions for AGN feedback in a large statistical sense, in particular the influence on the AGN number density evolution. 

Allgemeine Datenschutzerklärung für die Internetseiten der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München:

 https://www.uni-muenchen.de/funktionen/datenschutz/index.html

 

Erklärung Zusätze

Diese Datenschutzerklärung klärt Sie über die Art, den Umfang und Zweck der Verarbeitung von personenbezogenen Daten (nachfolgend kurz „Daten“) innerhalb unseres Onlineangebotes und der mit ihm verbundenen Webseiten, Funktionen und Inhalte sowie externen Onlinepräsenzen, wie z.B. unser Social Media Profile auf (nachfolgend gemeinsam bezeichnet als „Onlineangebot“). Im Hinblick auf die verwendeten Begrifflichkeiten, wie z.B. „Verarbeitung“ oder „Verantwortlicher“ verweisen wir auf die Definitionen im Art. 4 der Datenschutzgrundverordnung (DSGVO).

 

Arten der verarbeiteten Daten:

- Bestandsdaten (z.B., Namen, Adressen).
- Kontaktdaten (z.B., E-Mail, Telefonnummern).
- Inhaltsdaten (z.B., Texteingaben, Fotografien, Videos).
- Nutzungsdaten (z.B., besuchte Webseiten, Interesse an Inhalten, Zugriffszeiten).
- Meta-/Kommunikationsdaten (z.B., Geräte-Informationen, IP-Adressen).

Kategorien betroffener Personen

Besucher und Nutzer des Onlineangebotes (Nachfolgend bezeichnen wir die betroffenen Personen zusammenfassend auch als „Nutzer“).

Zweck der Verarbeitung

- Zurverfügungstellung des Onlineangebotes, seiner Funktionen und Inhalte.
- Beantwortung von Kontaktanfragen und Kommunikation mit Nutzern.
- Sicherheitsmaßnahmen.
- Reichweitenmessung/Marketing

Verwendete Begrifflichkeiten

„Personenbezogene Daten“ sind alle Informationen, die sich auf eine identifizierte oder identifizierbare natürliche Person (im Folgenden „betroffene Person“) beziehen; als identifizierbar wird eine natürliche Person angesehen, die direkt oder indirekt, insbesondere mittels Zuordnung zu einer Kennung wie einem Namen, zu einer Kennnummer, zu Standortdaten, zu einer Online-Kennung (z.B. Cookie) oder zu einem oder mehreren besonderen Merkmalen identifiziert werden kann, die Ausdruck der physischen, physiologischen, genetischen, psychischen, wirtschaftlichen, kulturellen oder sozialen Identität dieser natürlichen Person sind.

„Verarbeitung“ ist jeder mit oder ohne Hilfe automatisierter Verfahren ausgeführte Vorgang oder jede solche Vorgangsreihe im Zusammenhang mit personenbezogenen Daten. Der Begriff reicht weit und umfasst praktisch jeden Umgang mit Daten.

„Pseudonymisierung“ die Verarbeitung personenbezogener Daten in einer Weise, dass die personenbezogenen Daten ohne Hinzuziehung zusätzlicher Informationen nicht mehr einer spezifischen betroffenen Person zugeordnet werden können, sofern diese zusätzlichen Informationen gesondert aufbewahrt werden und technischen und organisatorischen Maßnahmen unterliegen, die gewährleisten, dass die personenbezogenen Daten nicht einer identifizierten oder identifizierbaren natürlichen Person zugewiesen werden.

„Profiling“ jede Art der automatisierten Verarbeitung personenbezogener Daten, die darin besteht, dass diese personenbezogenen Daten verwendet werden, um bestimmte persönliche Aspekte, die sich auf eine natürliche Person beziehen, zu bewerten, insbesondere um Aspekte bezüglich Arbeitsleistung, wirtschaftliche Lage, Gesundheit, persönliche Vorlieben, Interessen, Zuverlässigkeit, Verhalten, Aufenthaltsort oder Ortswechsel dieser natürlichen Person zu analysieren oder vorherzusagen.

Als „Verantwortlicher“ wird die natürliche oder juristische Person, Behörde, Einrichtung oder andere Stelle, die allein oder gemeinsam mit anderen über die Zwecke und Mittel der Verarbeitung von personenbezogenen Daten entscheidet, bezeichnet.

„Auftragsverarbeiter“ eine natürliche oder juristische Person, Behörde, Einrichtung oder andere Stelle, die personenbezogene Daten im Auftrag des Verantwortlichen verarbeitet.

Maßgebliche Rechtsgrundlagen

Nach Maßgabe des Art. 13 DSGVO teilen wir Ihnen die Rechtsgrundlagen unserer Datenverarbeitungen mit. Sofern die Rechtsgrundlage in der Datenschutzerklärung nicht genannt wird, gilt Folgendes: Die Rechtsgrundlage für die Einholung von Einwilligungen ist Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. a und Art. 7 DSGVO, die Rechtsgrundlage für die Verarbeitung zur Erfüllung unserer Leistungen und Durchführung vertraglicher Maßnahmen sowie Beantwortung von Anfragen ist Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. b DSGVO, die Rechtsgrundlage für die Verarbeitung zur Erfüllung unserer rechtlichen Verpflichtungen ist Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. c DSGVO, und die Rechtsgrundlage für die Verarbeitung zur Wahrung unserer berechtigten Interessen ist Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. f DSGVO. Für den Fall, dass lebenswichtige Interessen der betroffenen Person oder einer anderen natürlichen Person eine Verarbeitung personenbezogener Daten erforderlich machen, dient Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. d DSGVO als Rechtsgrundlage.

Sicherheitsmaßnahmen

Wir treffen nach Maßgabe des Art. 32 DSGVO unter Berücksichtigung des Stands der Technik, der Implementierungskosten und der Art, des Umfangs, der Umstände und der Zwecke der Verarbeitung sowie der unterschiedlichen Eintrittswahrscheinlichkeit und Schwere des Risikos für die Rechte und Freiheiten natürlicher Personen, geeignete technische und organisatorische Maßnahmen, um ein dem Risiko angemessenes Schutzniveau zu gewährleisten.

Zu den Maßnahmen gehören insbesondere die Sicherung der Vertraulichkeit, Integrität und Verfügbarkeit von Daten durch Kontrolle des physischen Zugangs zu den Daten, als auch des sie betreffenden Zugriffs, der Eingabe, Weitergabe, der Sicherung der Verfügbarkeit und ihrer Trennung. Des Weiteren haben wir Verfahren eingerichtet, die eine Wahrnehmung von Betroffenenrechten, Löschung von Daten und Reaktion auf Gefährdung der Daten gewährleisten. Ferner berücksichtigen wir den Schutz personenbezogener Daten bereits bei der Entwicklung, bzw. Auswahl von Hardware, Software sowie Verfahren, entsprechend dem Prinzip des Datenschutzes durch Technikgestaltung und durch datenschutzfreundliche Voreinstellungen (Art. 25 DSGVO).

Zusammenarbeit mit Auftragsverarbeitern und Dritten

Sofern wir im Rahmen unserer Verarbeitung Daten gegenüber anderen Personen und Unternehmen (Auftragsverarbeitern oder Dritten) offenbaren, sie an diese übermitteln oder ihnen sonst Zugriff auf die Daten gewähren, erfolgt dies nur auf Grundlage einer gesetzlichen Erlaubnis (z.B. wenn eine Übermittlung der Daten an Dritte, wie an Zahlungsdienstleister, gem. Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. b DSGVO zur Vertragserfüllung erforderlich ist), Sie eingewilligt haben, eine rechtliche Verpflichtung dies vorsieht oder auf Grundlage unserer berechtigten Interessen (z.B. beim Einsatz von Beauftragten, Webhostern, etc.).

Sofern wir Dritte mit der Verarbeitung von Daten auf Grundlage eines sog. „Auftragsverarbeitungsvertrages“ beauftragen, geschieht dies auf Grundlage des Art. 28 DSGVO.

Übermittlungen in Drittländer

Sofern wir Daten in einem Drittland (d.h. außerhalb der Europäischen Union (EU) oder des Europäischen Wirtschaftsraums (EWR)) verarbeiten oder dies im Rahmen der Inanspruchnahme von Diensten Dritter oder Offenlegung, bzw. Übermittlung von Daten an Dritte geschieht, erfolgt dies nur, wenn es zur Erfüllung unserer (vor)vertraglichen Pflichten, auf Grundlage Ihrer Einwilligung, aufgrund einer rechtlichen Verpflichtung oder auf Grundlage unserer berechtigten Interessen geschieht. Vorbehaltlich gesetzlicher oder vertraglicher Erlaubnisse, verarbeiten oder lassen wir die Daten in einem Drittland nur beim Vorliegen der besonderen Voraussetzungen der Art. 44 ff. DSGVO verarbeiten. D.h. die Verarbeitung erfolgt z.B. auf Grundlage besonderer Garantien, wie der offiziell anerkannten Feststellung eines der EU entsprechenden Datenschutzniveaus (z.B. für die USA durch das „Privacy Shield“) oder Beachtung offiziell anerkannter spezieller vertraglicher Verpflichtungen (so genannte „Standardvertragsklauseln“).

Rechte der betroffenen Personen

Sie haben das Recht, eine Bestätigung darüber zu verlangen, ob betreffende Daten verarbeitet werden und auf Auskunft über diese Daten sowie auf weitere Informationen und Kopie der Daten entsprechend Art. 15 DSGVO.

Sie haben entsprechend. Art. 16 DSGVO das Recht, die Vervollständigung der Sie betreffenden Daten oder die Berichtigung der Sie betreffenden unrichtigen Daten zu verlangen.

Sie haben nach Maßgabe des Art. 17 DSGVO das Recht zu verlangen, dass betreffende Daten unverzüglich gelöscht werden, bzw. alternativ nach Maßgabe des Art. 18 DSGVO eine Einschränkung der Verarbeitung der Daten zu verlangen.

Sie haben das Recht zu verlangen, dass die Sie betreffenden Daten, die Sie uns bereitgestellt haben nach Maßgabe des Art. 20 DSGVO zu erhalten und deren Übermittlung an andere Verantwortliche zu fordern.

Sie haben ferner gem. Art. 77 DSGVO das Recht, eine Beschwerde bei der zuständigen Aufsichtsbehörde einzureichen.

Widerrufsrecht

Sie haben das Recht, erteilte Einwilligungen gem. Art. 7 Abs. 3 DSGVO mit Wirkung für die Zukunft zu widerrufen

Widerspruchsrecht

Sie können der künftigen Verarbeitung der Sie betreffenden Daten nach Maßgabe des Art. 21 DSGVO jederzeit widersprechen. Der Widerspruch kann insbesondere gegen die Verarbeitung für Zwecke der Direktwerbung erfolgen.

Cookies und Widerspruchsrecht bei Direktwerbung

Als „Cookies“ werden kleine Dateien bezeichnet, die auf Rechnern der Nutzer gespeichert werden. Innerhalb der Cookies können unterschiedliche Angaben gespeichert werden. Ein Cookie dient primär dazu, die Angaben zu einem Nutzer (bzw. dem Gerät auf dem das Cookie gespeichert ist) während oder auch nach seinem Besuch innerhalb eines Onlineangebotes zu speichern. Als temporäre Cookies, bzw. „Session-Cookies“ oder „transiente Cookies“, werden Cookies bezeichnet, die gelöscht werden, nachdem ein Nutzer ein Onlineangebot verlässt und seinen Browser schließt. In einem solchen Cookie kann z.B. der Inhalt eines Warenkorbs in einem Onlineshop oder ein Login-Status gespeichert werden. Als „permanent“ oder „persistent“ werden Cookies bezeichnet, die auch nach dem Schließen des Browsers gespeichert bleiben. So kann z.B. der Login-Status gespeichert werden, wenn die Nutzer diese nach mehreren Tagen aufsuchen. Ebenso können in einem solchen Cookie die Interessen der Nutzer gespeichert werden, die für Reichweitenmessung oder Marketingzwecke verwendet werden. Als „Third-Party-Cookie“ werden Cookies bezeichnet, die von anderen Anbietern als dem Verantwortlichen, der das Onlineangebot betreibt, angeboten werden (andernfalls, wenn es nur dessen Cookies sind spricht man von „First-Party Cookies“).

Wir können temporäre und permanente Cookies einsetzen und klären hierüber im Rahmen unserer Datenschutzerklärung auf.

Falls die Nutzer nicht möchten, dass Cookies auf ihrem Rechner gespeichert werden, werden sie gebeten die entsprechende Option in den Systemeinstellungen ihres Browsers zu deaktivieren. Gespeicherte Cookies können in den Systemeinstellungen des Browsers gelöscht werden. Der Ausschluss von Cookies kann zu Funktionseinschränkungen dieses Onlineangebotes führen.

Ein genereller Widerspruch gegen den Einsatz der zu Zwecken des Onlinemarketing eingesetzten Cookies kann bei einer Vielzahl der Dienste, vor allem im Fall des Trackings, über die US-amerikanische Seite http://www.aboutads.info/choices/ oder die EU-Seite http://www.youronlinechoices.com/ erklärt werden. Des Weiteren kann die Speicherung von Cookies mittels deren Abschaltung in den Einstellungen des Browsers erreicht werden. Bitte beachten Sie, dass dann gegebenenfalls nicht alle Funktionen dieses Onlineangebotes genutzt werden können.

Löschung von Daten

Die von uns verarbeiteten Daten werden nach Maßgabe der Art. 17 und 18 DSGVO gelöscht oder in ihrer Verarbeitung eingeschränkt. Sofern nicht im Rahmen dieser Datenschutzerklärung ausdrücklich angegeben, werden die bei uns gespeicherten Daten gelöscht, sobald sie für ihre Zweckbestimmung nicht mehr erforderlich sind und der Löschung keine gesetzlichen Aufbewahrungspflichten entgegenstehen. Sofern die Daten nicht gelöscht werden, weil sie für andere und gesetzlich zulässige Zwecke erforderlich sind, wird deren Verarbeitung eingeschränkt. D.h. die Daten werden gesperrt und nicht für andere Zwecke verarbeitet. Das gilt z.B. für Daten, die aus handels- oder steuerrechtlichen Gründen aufbewahrt werden müssen.

Nach gesetzlichen Vorgaben in Deutschland, erfolgt die Aufbewahrung insbesondere für 10 Jahre gemäß §§ 147 Abs. 1 AO, 257 Abs. 1 Nr. 1 und 4, Abs. 4 HGB (Bücher, Aufzeichnungen, Lageberichte, Buchungsbelege, Handelsbücher, für Besteuerung relevanter Unterlagen, etc.) und 6 Jahre gemäß § 257 Abs. 1 Nr. 2 und 3, Abs. 4 HGB (Handelsbriefe).

Nach gesetzlichen Vorgaben in Österreich erfolgt die Aufbewahrung insbesondere für 7 J gemäß § 132 Abs. 1 BAO (Buchhaltungsunterlagen, Belege/Rechnungen, Konten, Belege, Geschäftspapiere, Aufstellung der Einnahmen und Ausgaben, etc.), für 22 Jahre im Zusammenhang mit Grundstücken und für 10 Jahre bei Unterlagen im Zusammenhang mit elektronisch erbrachten Leistungen, Telekommunikations-, Rundfunk- und Fernsehleistungen, die an Nichtunternehmer in EU-Mitgliedstaaten erbracht werden und für die der Mini-One-Stop-Shop (MOSS) in Anspruch genommen wird.

 

Kontaktaufnahme

 

Bei der Kontaktaufnahme mit uns (z.B. per Kontaktformular, E-Mail, Telefon oder via sozialer Medien) werden die Angaben des Nutzers zur Bearbeitung der Kontaktanfrage und deren Abwicklung gem. Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. b. (im Rahmen vertraglicher-/vorvertraglicher Beziehungen), Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. f. (andere Anfragen) DSGVO verarbeitet.. Die Angaben der Nutzer können in einem Customer-Relationship-Management System ("CRM System") oder vergleichbarer Anfragenorganisation gespeichert werden.

Wir löschen die Anfragen, sofern diese nicht mehr erforderlich sind. Wir überprüfen die Erforderlichkeit alle zwei Jahre; Ferner gelten die gesetzlichen Archivierungspflichten.

 

Hosting und E-Mail-Versand

 

Die von uns in Anspruch genommenen Hosting-Leistungen dienen der Zurverfügungstellung der folgenden Leistungen: Infrastruktur- und Plattformdienstleistungen, Rechenkapazität, Speicherplatz und Datenbankdienste, E-Mail-Versand, Sicherheitsleistungen sowie technische Wartungsleistungen, die wir zum Zwecke des Betriebs dieses Onlineangebotes einsetzen.

Hierbei verarbeiten wir, bzw. unser Hostinganbieter Bestandsdaten, Kontaktdaten, Inhaltsdaten, Vertragsdaten, Nutzungsdaten, Meta- und Kommunikationsdaten von Kunden, Interessenten und Besuchern dieses Onlineangebotes auf Grundlage unserer berechtigten Interessen an einer effizienten und sicheren Zurverfügungstellung dieses Onlineangebotes gem. Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. f DSGVO i.V.m. Art. 28 DSGVO (Abschluss Auftragsverarbeitungsvertrag).

 

Erhebung von Zugriffsdaten und Logfiles

 

Wir, bzw. unser Hostinganbieter, erhebt auf Grundlage unserer berechtigten Interessen im Sinne des Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. f. DSGVO Daten über jeden Zugriff auf den Server, auf dem sich dieser Dienst befindet (sogenannte Serverlogfiles). Zu den Zugriffsdaten gehören Name der abgerufenen Webseite, Datei, Datum und Uhrzeit des Abrufs, übertragene Datenmenge, Meldung über erfolgreichen Abruf, Browsertyp nebst Version, das Betriebssystem des Nutzers, Referrer URL (die zuvor besuchte Seite), IP-Adresse und der anfragende Provider.

Logfile-Informationen werden aus Sicherheitsgründen (z.B. zur Aufklärung von Missbrauchs- oder Betrugshandlungen) für die Dauer von maximal 7 Tagen gespeichert und danach gelöscht. Daten, deren weitere Aufbewahrung zu Beweiszwecken erforderlich ist, sind bis zur endgültigen Klärung des jeweiligen Vorfalls von der Löschung ausgenommen.

 

Google Analytics

 

Wir setzen auf Grundlage unserer berechtigten Interessen (d.h. Interesse an der Analyse, Optimierung und wirtschaftlichem Betrieb unseres Onlineangebotes im Sinne des Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. f. DSGVO) Google Analytics, einen Webanalysedienst der Google LLC („Google“) ein. Google verwendet Cookies. Die durch das Cookie erzeugten Informationen über Benutzung des Onlineangebotes durch die Nutzer werden in der Regel an einen Server von Google in den USA übertragen und dort gespeichert.

Google ist unter dem Privacy-Shield-Abkommen zertifiziert und bietet hierdurch eine Garantie, das europäische Datenschutzrecht einzuhalten (https://www.privacyshield.gov/participant?id=a2zt000000001L5AAI&status=Active).

Google wird diese Informationen in unserem Auftrag benutzen, um die Nutzung unseres Onlineangebotes durch die Nutzer auszuwerten, um Reports über die Aktivitäten innerhalb dieses Onlineangebotes zusammenzustellen und um weitere, mit der Nutzung dieses Onlineangebotes und der Internetnutzung verbundene Dienstleistungen, uns gegenüber zu erbringen. Dabei können aus den verarbeiteten Daten pseudonyme Nutzungsprofile der Nutzer erstellt werden.

Wir setzen Google Analytics nur mit aktivierter IP-Anonymisierung ein. Das bedeutet, die IP-Adresse der Nutzer wird von Google innerhalb von Mitgliedstaaten der Europäischen Union oder in anderen Vertragsstaaten des Abkommens über den Europäischen Wirtschaftsraum gekürzt. Nur in Ausnahmefällen wird die volle IP-Adresse an einen Server von Google in den USA übertragen und dort gekürzt.

Die von dem Browser des Nutzers übermittelte IP-Adresse wird nicht mit anderen Daten von Google zusammengeführt. Die Nutzer können die Speicherung der Cookies durch eine entsprechende Einstellung ihrer Browser-Software verhindern; die Nutzer können darüber hinaus die Erfassung der durch das Cookie erzeugten und auf ihre Nutzung des Onlineangebotes bezogenen Daten an Google sowie die Verarbeitung dieser Daten durch Google verhindern, indem sie das unter folgendem Link verfügbare Browser-Plugin herunterladen und installieren: http://tools.google.com/dlpage/gaoptout?hl=de.

Weitere Informationen zur Datennutzung durch Google, Einstellungs- und Widerspruchsmöglichkeiten, erfahren Sie in der Datenschutzerklärung von Google (https://policies.google.com/technologies/ads) sowie in den Einstellungen für die Darstellung von Werbeeinblendungen durch Google (https://adssettings.google.com/authenticated).

Die personenbezogenen Daten der Nutzer werden nach 14 Monaten gelöscht oder anonymisiert.

 

Google Universal Analytics

 

Wir setzen Google Analytics in der Ausgestaltung als „Universal-Analytics“ ein. „Universal Analytics“ bezeichnet ein Verfahren von Google Analytics, bei dem die Nutzeranalyse auf Grundlage einer pseudonymen Nutzer-ID erfolgt und damit ein pseudonymes Profil des Nutzers mit Informationen aus der Nutzung verschiedener Geräten erstellt wird (sog. „Cross-Device-Tracking“).

 

Clustermaps

https://clustrmaps.com/policy

 

 

Onlinepräsenzen in sozialen Medien

 

Wir unterhalten Onlinepräsenzen innerhalb sozialer Netzwerke und Plattformen, um mit den dort aktiven Kunden, Interessenten und Nutzern kommunizieren und sie dort über unsere Leistungen informieren zu können.

Wir weisen darauf hin, dass dabei Daten der Nutzer außerhalb des Raumes der Europäischen Union verarbeitet werden können. Hierdurch können sich für die Nutzer Risiken ergeben, weil so z.B. die Durchsetzung der Rechte der Nutzer erschwert werden könnte. Im Hinblick auf US-Anbieter die unter dem Privacy-Shield zertifiziert sind, weisen wir darauf hin, dass sie sich damit verpflichten, die Datenschutzstandards der EU einzuhalten.

Ferner werden die Daten der Nutzer im Regelfall für Marktforschungs- und Werbezwecke verarbeitet. So können z.B. aus dem Nutzungsverhalten und sich daraus ergebenden Interessen der Nutzer Nutzungsprofile erstellt werden. Die Nutzungsprofile können wiederum verwendet werden, um z.B. Werbeanzeigen innerhalb und außerhalb der Plattformen zu schalten, die mutmaßlich den Interessen der Nutzer entsprechen. Zu diesen Zwecken werden im Regelfall Cookies auf den Rechnern der Nutzer gespeichert, in denen das Nutzungsverhalten und die Interessen der Nutzer gespeichert werden. Ferner können in den Nutzungsprofilen auch Daten unabhängig der von den Nutzern verwendeten Geräte gespeichert werden (insbesondere wenn die Nutzer Mitglieder der jeweiligen Plattformen sind und bei diesen eingeloggt sind).

Die Verarbeitung der personenbezogenen Daten der Nutzer erfolgt auf Grundlage unserer berechtigten Interessen an einer effektiven Information der Nutzer und Kommunikation mit den Nutzern gem. Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. f. DSGVO. Falls die Nutzer von den jeweiligen Anbietern um eine Einwilligung in die Datenverarbeitung gebeten werden (d.h. ihr Einverständnis z.B. über das Anhaken eines Kontrollkästchens oder Bestätigung einer Schaltfläche erklären) ist die Rechtsgrundlage der Verarbeitung Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. a., Art. 7 DSGVO.

Für eine detaillierte Darstellung der jeweiligen Verarbeitungen und der Widerspruchsmöglichkeiten (Opt-Out), verweisen wir auf die nachfolgend verlinkten Angaben der Anbieter.

Auch im Fall von Auskunftsanfragen und der Geltendmachung von Nutzerrechten, weisen wir darauf hin, dass diese am effektivsten bei den Anbietern geltend gemacht werden können. Nur die Anbieter haben jeweils Zugriff auf die Daten der Nutzer und können direkt entsprechende Maßnahmen ergreifen und Auskünfte geben. Sollten Sie dennoch Hilfe benötigen, dann können Sie sich an uns wenden.

- Facebook (Facebook Ireland Ltd., 4 Grand Canal Square, Grand Canal Harbour, Dublin 2, Irland) - Datenschutzerklärung: https://www.facebook.com/about/privacy/, Opt-Out: https://www.facebook.com/settings?tab=ads und http://www.youronlinechoices.com, Privacy Shield: https://www.privacyshield.gov/participant?id=a2zt0000000GnywAAC&status=Active.

- Google/ YouTube (Google LLC, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA) – Datenschutzerklärung:  https://policies.google.com/privacy, Opt-Out: https://adssettings.google.com/authenticated, Privacy Shield: https://www.privacyshield.gov/participant?id=a2zt000000001L5AAI&status=Active.

- Instagram (Instagram Inc., 1601 Willow Road, Menlo Park, CA, 94025, USA) – Datenschutzerklärung/ Opt-Out: http://instagram.com/about/legal/privacy/.

- Twitter (Twitter Inc., 1355 Market Street, Suite 900, San Francisco, CA 94103, USA) - Datenschutzerklärung: https://twitter.com/de/privacy, Opt-Out: https://twitter.com/personalization, Privacy Shield: https://www.privacyshield.gov/participant?id=a2zt0000000TORzAAO&status=Active.

- Pinterest (Pinterest Inc., 635 High Street, Palo Alto, CA, 94301, USA) – Datenschutzerklärung/ Opt-Out: https://about.pinterest.com/de/privacy-policy.

- LinkedIn (LinkedIn Ireland Unlimited Company Wilton Place, Dublin 2, Irland) - Datenschutzerklärung https://www.linkedin.com/legal/privacy-policy , Opt-Out: https://www.linkedin.com/psettings/guest-controls/retargeting-opt-out, Privacy Shield: https://www.privacyshield.gov/participant?id=a2zt0000000L0UZAA0&status=Active.

- Xing (XING AG, Dammtorstraße 29-32, 20354 Hamburg, Deutschland) - Datenschutzerklärung/ Opt-Out: https://privacy.xing.com/de/datenschutzerklaerung.

- Wakalet (Wakelet Limited, 76 Quay Street, Manchester, M3 4PR, United Kingdom) - Datenschutzerklärung/ Opt-Out: https://wakelet.com/privacy.html.

- Soundcloud (SoundCloud Limited, Rheinsberger Str. 76/77, 10115 Berlin, Deutschland) - Datenschutzerklärung/ Opt-Out: https://soundcloud.com/pages/privacy.

 

Einbindung von Diensten und Inhalten Dritter

 

Wir setzen innerhalb unseres Onlineangebotes auf Grundlage unserer berechtigten Interessen (d.h. Interesse an der Analyse, Optimierung und wirtschaftlichem Betrieb unseres Onlineangebotes im Sinne des Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. f. DSGVO) Inhalts- oder Serviceangebote von Drittanbietern ein, um deren Inhalte und Services, wie z.B. Videos oder Schriftarten einzubinden (nachfolgend einheitlich bezeichnet als “Inhalte”).

Dies setzt immer voraus, dass die Drittanbieter dieser Inhalte, die IP-Adresse der Nutzer wahrnehmen, da sie ohne die IP-Adresse die Inhalte nicht an deren Browser senden könnten. Die IP-Adresse ist damit für die Darstellung dieser Inhalte erforderlich. Wir bemühen uns nur solche Inhalte zu verwenden, deren jeweilige Anbieter die IP-Adresse lediglich zur Auslieferung der Inhalte verwenden. Drittanbieter können ferner so genannte Pixel-Tags (unsichtbare Grafiken, auch als "Web Beacons" bezeichnet) für statistische oder Marketingzwecke verwenden. Durch die "Pixel-Tags" können Informationen, wie der Besucherverkehr auf den Seiten dieser Website ausgewertet werden. Die pseudonymen Informationen können ferner in Cookies auf dem Gerät der Nutzer gespeichert werden und unter anderem technische Informationen zum Browser und Betriebssystem, verweisende Webseiten, Besuchszeit sowie weitere Angaben zur Nutzung unseres Onlineangebotes enthalten, als auch mit solchen Informationen aus anderen Quellen verbunden werden.

 

Vimeo

 

Wir können die Videos der Plattform “Vimeo” des Anbieters Vimeo Inc., Attention: Legal Department, 555 West 18th Street New York, New York 10011, USA, einbinden. Datenschutzerklärung: https://vimeo.com/privacy. WIr weisen darauf hin, dass Vimeo Google Analytics einsetzen kann und verweisen hierzu auf die Datenschutzerklärung (https://www.google.com/policies/privacy) sowie Opt-Out-Möglichkeiten für Google-Analytics (http://tools.google.com/dlpage/gaoptout?hl=de) oder die Einstellungen von Google für die Datennutzung zu Marketingzwecken (https://adssettings.google.com/.).

 

Youtube

 

Wir binden die Videos der Plattform “YouTube” des Anbieters Google LLC, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA, ein. Datenschutzerklärung: https://www.google.com/policies/privacy/, Opt-Out: https://adssettings.google.com/authenticated.

 

Google Maps

 

Wir binden die Landkarten des Dienstes “Google Maps” des Anbieters Google LLC, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA, ein. Zu den verarbeiteten Daten können insbesondere IP-Adressen und Standortdaten der Nutzer gehören, die jedoch nicht ohne deren Einwilligung (im Regelfall im Rahmen der Einstellungen ihrer Mobilgeräte vollzogen), erhoben werden. Die Daten können in den USA verarbeitet werden. Datenschutzerklärung: https://www.google.com/policies/privacy/, Opt-Out: https://adssettings.google.com/authenticated.

 

Twitter

 

Innerhalb unseres Onlineangebotes können Funktionen und Inhalte des Dienstes Twitter, angeboten durch die Twitter Inc., 1355 Market Street, Suite 900, San Francisco, CA 94103, USA, eingebunden werden. Hierzu können z.B. Inhalte wie Bilder, Videos oder Texte und Schaltflächen gehören, mit denen Nutzer Inhalte dieses Onlineangebotes innerhalb von Twitter teilen können.
Sofern die Nutzer Mitglieder der Plattform Twitter sind, kann Twitter den Aufruf der o.g. Inhalte und Funktionen den dortigen Profilen der Nutzer zuordnen. Twitter ist unter dem Privacy-Shield-Abkommen zertifiziert und bietet hierdurch eine Garantie, das europäische Datenschutzrecht einzuhalten (https://www.privacyshield.gov/participant?id=a2zt0000000TORzAAO&status=Active). Datenschutzerklärung: https://twitter.com/de/privacy, Opt-Out: https://twitter.com/personalization.

Erstellt mit Datenschutz-Generator.de von RA Dr. Thomas Schwenke

Galactic Dynamics

Galaxies are the fundamental building blocks of the Universe. Massive galaxies can be subdivided into two major morphological groups. Elliptical galaxies are characterised by a dominant spheroidal stellar component with stars moving on random orbits. Spiral galaxies, on the other hand, show a dominant disk component made of stars and gas, including a central spheroidal bulge component. In both cases, massive, extended dark matter halos appear to surround the visible components of the galaxies. While massive galaxies contain most of the mass in the Universe, by far the most frequent galaxy type are dwarf galaxies which often have complex, irregular gas distributions as even a few supernovae can strongly perturb or even destroy any disk component. Dwarfs are often found as satellites orbiting more massive galaxies, providing interesting information about the hierarchical building blocks that merged into giant galaxies. High-resolution photometry in different wavelength regimes and spectroscopic data now gives very detailed insight into the internal structure of galaxies. Many observations are puzzling and contain information about the complex formation history of galaxies and their internal dynamics. Questions that we are currently investigating are:

 

The Peculiar Structure of High-Redshift Disk Galaxies

Young disk galaxies have recently been observed at high cosmological redshifts of z=2, corresponding to epochs where the Universe was just 1/3rd its present age. This epoche is especially interesting as it corresponds to the peak in the star formation rate of the Cosmos and the time when the morphologies of the galaxies were determined. High-redshift galaxies have recently been detected and observed with the larges telescopes e.g. of ESO. It soon became clear that these obejcts are very different compared with present-day disk galaxies. For example, they form stars with enormous rates that are a factor of 10 - 100 higher than in nowadays. The star formation is concentrated in gigantic clumps of molecular gas, about 1000 times larger than present-day molecular clouds, and as big as dwarf galaxies. In addition, the gas in the disks is highly turbulent, driven by energetic sources that are not well understood up to now. In collaboration with the observational infrared/submillimeter group at the Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching we are investigating the origin and structure of the observed giant gas clumps in young galactic disks as well as their evolution and star formation history. Are these clumps the sites for the formation of the old globular clusters and supermassive black holes that are found today in galaxies as relics of an earlier time of violent star formation? Is there evidence of massive gas accretion onto these young galactic disks from the surrounding cosmic web which serves as a reservoir of gas? Into which present-day galaxy type do these disks evolve? How important are these galaxies for the chemical enrichment of the cosmos with heavy elements?

 

The Structure of Elliptical Galaxies and their Relation to Supermassive Black holes

In recent years observations have revealed a strong correlation between the central supermassive black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies as manifested in the relation between the BH mass and the bulge velocity dispersion, M_BH-sigma and the bulge stellar mass M_BH-M_bulge. More massive BHs typically reside in more massive galaxies, with the observed relations thus indicating a link between the formation of the BHs and their host galaxies. Energetic feedback from BHs during the quasar phase can potentially drive out gas from the galaxies thus setting a maximum scale for galaxy masses. In addition, this AGN feedback might quench star formation in the most massive galaxies explaining why massive galaxies are typically non-starforming ellipticals We have implemented a simple Bondi-Hoyle based BH accretion model into our numerical code. In this model 0.5% of the accreted rest mass energy is coupled as thermal energy to the surrounding gas. Expanding on previous work we have showed that the observed relations can be produced in both equal- and unequal-mass merger simulations of gas-rich disks and early-type galaxies. In the Figure below we show a comparison of our simulated sample with the local observed relations and demonstrate that both equal- and unequal-disk mergers reproduce the observed results equally well. In addition we have studied the evolution of the scaling relations during the merger of the BHs as it is not obvious if the scaling relations are valid during the merging process and at what stage the galaxies evolve onto the relations. Finally, we have studied in detail the termination of star formation by energetic BH feedback during galaxy mergers as this is a viable mechanism for reproducing the observed population of dead and red elliptical galaxies. black hole sigma and stellar mass relationThe image shows the M_BH-sigma (left) and M_BH-M_* (right) relations for our complete sample of 1:1 (circles) and 3:1 (triangles) mergers. The black, green and red symbols show the effect of varying the initial gas mass fraction, whereas the blue symbols show the variation caused by the orbit and initial geometry for a fixed gas fraction. The lines show the observed relations with errors by Tremaine et al. (2002) and Haring&Rix (2004), respectively (Johansson et al. 2009).

 

 

The Outer Structure of Elliptical Galaxies and their Dark Matter Halos

The outer haloes of elliptical galaxies have been studied by observations for several years to adress the questions of the nature of the Dark Matter halo they are embedded in and the mechanisms that drive the formation of elliptical galaxies. While the extended cold gas disks in spiral galaxies can be used to measure the rotation curves and the line-of-sight velocity dispersions (LOSVD), for ellipticals we need to use other tracers for the outher haloes since ellipticals do not contain any cold gas anymore. Instead, planetary nebulae have been used as tracers for the LOSVD. Those measurements revealed a huge variety of different profiles, some flattening to nearly constant values, some increasing again in the outer part and some decreasing fastly, showing nearly no evidence of a dark matter halo. While observations only show us a snapshot in the life of the galaxy, with simulations we can look at evolution scenarios. Currently there are two different scenarios discussed: The build up of an elliptical by several minor mergers spread over time, and the build up through a single major merger (a merger with a mass ratio less than 3:1). Also from obeservations we know that especially very massive elliptical galaxies are most frequent in very dense environments, like in galaxy clusters, and those environments provide best conditions for both merger scenarios. We study a sample of simulated ellipticals with different formation scenarios, from major merger scenarios to minor merger build ups, and different environments, from dense cluster environments to isolated field environments, to explain the origin of these different profiles and understand what we can learn from them.

 

 

The Origin and Structure of Magnetic Fields in present-day Galaxies and Galaxy Groups

simulated radio map of the Antenae galaxiesThe effect of nonthermal pressure components, i.e. magnetic fields and high energy particles, on the evolution of galaxies and structure formation in the Universe, is still not well understood. Contrary to the thermal pressure, nonthermal components are not subject to cooling processes. Thus, once present, a nonthermal pressure affects the environment over long timescales. This influence might impede the collapse of gas and thus lower the star formation rate. Along with the reduction of star formation, the injection of cosmic rays as well as the associated turbulence is also lowered. Turbulence, however, is believed to be the main source of magnetic field amplification. This correlation suggests a self-regulated state and thus equipartition between all corresponding pressure components. This theoretical scenario, which is supported also by the Radio-FIR-correlation, is the framework of our research. Magnetic fields pervade intracluster and interstellar material. Even more astonishing, strong (10-100 micro Gauss) magnetic fields have been observed in very young objects like damed Ly-alpha systems, an observation, which is up to now not satisfactory explained. As a first step towards a more complete understanding of the evolution of magnetic fields in the Universe, we want to shed light on its evolution in isolated and interacting present-day galaxies. Our numerical investigations of the magnetic field evolution in interacting and merging galaxies suggest equipartition between the magnetic and turbulent pressure, as expected from theory. Thereby, even small intitial magnetic fields are amplified efficiently up to the equipartition level during the interaction. This result is particularly interesting in the framework of hierarchical structure formation, within which the formation of galaxies is characterized by more or less intense merging of smaller galactic subunits. Given our numerical results, the merging of these subunits might have been accompanied by a significant amplification of the magnetic field, thus explaining the high magneitc field values obserbed in damped Ly-alpha systems. Artificial radio maps derived from our simulations also compare well with observations.

 

Supernova Feedback and Galactic Halo Enrichment

supernova-driven windStar formation in galaxies causes supernova explosions, and thereby both turbulence and, if strong enough, winds or galactic fountains. Galactic winds are found in nearby starburst galaxies as well as in high-redshift Lyman-break systems. High star formation rates, outflow features and turbulence are prime characteristics for high-redshift galaxies. Phenomenologically, the stars form in clusters. The supernova feedback quickly evacuates these sites by forming hot bubbles. The star formation is hence quickly terminated, the bubbles overlap and form the wind. The outflowing ISM forms filaments that are observed in optical emission lines, but also in soft X-rays. Previous work suggests that the hot gas carried away by the wind is highly enriched with metals, comparable to solar metallicity, which is due to direct enrichment from supernovae. Winds are typically strong enough to propagate far into the intergalactic medium, suggesting that in combination with supernova feedback they likely play an important role in metal enrichment of galactic haloes. Here, we investigate thie phenomenon of galactic outflows with 3D hydrodynamics simulations, in particular with the aim to find a logical connection between star formation, turbulence and outflow characteristics. Both wind and convective solutions shall be investigated. Up to now, it is still poorly understood which mechanisms are most significant to launch a galactic outflow. Our simulations yield evidence that ISM turbulence generated by SN feedback is insufficient to give rise to an outflow, and a medium comprising several gas phases of different temperatures and densities is required in any case. Yet, buoyancy of SN bubbles might already become significant in a few cases, though it is likely not the main wind driver. This leaves the thermal pressure within superbubbles as the most promising source of energy strong enough to provoke galactic-scale outflows. It turned out, however, that under a wide range of conditions our simulations fail to blow a wind. To clarify in detail, which processes favour the development of convective or wind-like outflows, we propose a systematic parameter study.